UCSF

Tagged: pharmacogenomics

Research outlines challenges for adoption of new genetic tests

Every day, on average, ten new genetic tests become commercially available to help doctors and patients make more informed decisions about health care.

Giacomini named 2018 Volwiler Research Award recipient

Kathy Giacomini, PhD, has been named the 2018 Volwiler Research Achievement Award recipient by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

Giacomini to receive North American Scientific Achievement Award

Kathy Giacomini, PhD, a leader in the field of pharmacogenomics, has been named the 2017 recipient of the North American Scientific Achievement Award, presented by the International Society for the Study of Xenobiotics (ISSX). ISSX is an international association of scientists that promotes the understanding of the interactions of medicines and chemicals with living systems.

Classroom pharmacogenetics, post-hospital medications, and post-brain-surgery drugs take top honors

Studies of pharmacogenetics testing of pharmacy students as a teaching tool, an improved system to resolve medication issues after patients go home from the hospital, and the prophylactic use of an antiseizure drug for brain surgery patients took top honors at the Department of Clinical Pharmacy 18th Annual Spring Research Seminar.

Research: Elusive drug targets; cell demolition enzymes; useful pharmacogenomics info

Predicting difficult-to-detect drug binding sites

UCSF School of Pharmacy leads in NIH funding for 36th year in a row

For the 36th consecutive year, the UCSF School of Pharmacy has received more funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) than any other pharmacy school in the United States.

Giacomini to lead largest study of genetic, ethnic differences in effectiveness of leading diabetes drug

In people with type 2 diabetes, the body is less able to use the hormone insulin to regulate blood sugar. The disease affects 350 million patients globally—including 29 million in the United States, where it is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure, and non-accident-related amputations.

Kroetz leads new study of genetics of cancer drugs’ dose-limiting side effects

Taxanes are a class of drugs widely used to treat a variety of cancers, including breast, ovarian, lung, gastric, and head and neck. But dosages are often limited by toxic side effects—most commonly damage to the body’s peripheral nerves, causing numbness, pain, and/or hyper-sensitivity—that can require reduced or suspended treatment and which can linger for years in disease survivors.

Study discovers why leading gout medication is ineffective for many

Allopurinol, the first-choice medication for treating gout—an excruciatingly painful condition that is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis, afflicts more than eight million Americans, and is on the rise worldwide—is not fully effective in more than half of patients.

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