UCSF

Gullatt delivers first session of the Equity and Inclusion Speaker Series

On March 2, 2021, as the first featured speaker in the UCSF School of Pharmacy's Equity and Inclusion Speaker Series, Yvette Gullatt, PhD, delivered an overview of the University of California's wide-ranging efforts to make the university system welcoming and supportive of all. The talk covered initiatives spanning all the UC campuses, the successes of smaller programs at individual campuses, and areas in need of ongoing attention and improvement.

Gullatt is Vice President for Graduate and Undergraduate Affairs, Vice Provost for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, and Chief Diversity Officer for the University of California. She has two decades of leadership experience in student affairs, diversity, and institutional equity.

Video transcript

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[Joanna Trammell]
Good afternoon, everyone. Thank you for joining us for our first diversity and inclusion speaker series. I have the pleasure of introducing Dr. Gullatt As our first speaker today. I've had the pleasure of working with her during my time at UCOP. Just a few words about Dr. Gullatt, she's been a mentor to me and countless others. And I learned that Dr. Gullatt leads by example. I have great admiration for Yvette and she's made it her life's work to help students and increase diversity inclusion for UC leadership, faculty, students, and staff. Yvette it is so good to see you today. And I can't thank you enough for being with us, and for sharing with us the incredible work that you're doing for UC, and providing guidance on how we can build on our diversity equity inclusion efforts. And now I'd like to turn it over to our Dean. Joe...

[B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD]
Thank you, Joanna. I think as you all know, UCSF has adopted what we call Pride Values. And I don't know if Dr. Gullatt is aware of that, and pride values stand for the following. The P is for professionalism, R is respect. The I is integrity. The D is diversity, and the E is excellence. And I think everybody that's on the call knows that the School of Pharmacy completely adopts and endorses these values. While we've made some strides, I think in diversifying our faculty, staff and students, our efforts frankly, have not been enough. And that said, the current Equity and Inclusion speaker series, I think is an important effort to explore and problem-solve DEI issues. I particularly thank Joanna Trammell for her efforts in organizing this series. And I very much look forward to learning from Dr. Gullatt. And now I welcome Vice Dean, Sharon Yeomans, who will moderate the session. Dr. Yeomans...

[Sharon L. Youmans, PharmD, MPH]
Thank you, Dean. And good afternoon, everyone. And again, welcome to our first Equity and Inclusion speaker series. I have the pleasure of introducing Dr. Gullatt. To give you a little bit of background about her and her remarkable work. In terms of housekeeping, if you have questions during the presentation, please put them in the Q&A. And once Dr. Gullatt has completed her remarks, then we'll get right to the Q&A. So just a few words about Dr. Gullatt and her career. She has more than 20 years of experience in student affairs, diversity, and institutional equity leadership. She currently serves as Vice President for Graduate and Undergraduate Affairs, and Vice Provost for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion for the University of California system. Dr. Gullatt joined the office of the president in 1999, as the system wide director for Early and Immediate Outreach, she has served in a variety of system wide leadership positions since that time, including Vice Provost for Education Partnerships. In this role, she launched key initiatives to expand UC's role and public education, including data systems that help schools improve UC and CSU eligibility rates and partnerships with K through 12 schools, California higher education institutions, and community based organizations to improve academic preparation for more first generation, low income, and underrepresented students. In 2015, her role as Vice Provost was expanded to include responsibility for strategic expansion of programs to support UC-wide diversity and inclusion efforts. Before joining the Office of the President, Dr. Gullatt served for eight years in a variety of administrative and leadership roles at UC Berkeley. She received her bachelor's degree, master's and PhD degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research interests include African American life writing and Afro Christian discourses of community development and nationalism. She is a graduate of the Management Development Program at the Harvard Institutes for Higher Education, and the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the UC-Coro Systemwide Leadership Collaborative. So as you can see, Dr. Gullatt comes with a wealth of experience. I'm so excited to hear what she has to share with us. And so, without further ado, Dr. Gullatt, welcome to and thank you for being part of this initial series.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Well, thank you so much for the warm welcome. I'm really really deeply grateful and appreciative to be here. And I want to thank my colleague Joanna Trammell and to express how much we miss her at the at the Office of the President and so glad that she is with you and you all are benefiting from her expertise.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
I have a lot to talk about today. I hope I don't yammer on for too long. But Joanna and I, when we were exchanging emails about this, she said, Well, you know, can you talk about what diversity and inclusion looks like system wide, what's our and I'll talk about the framework that we employ, or that we want to see in place across the system for EDI work, which is how I'll abbreviate Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. I'd like to talk about the current state of the University within a State context, how are we doing when it comes to equity, diversity and inclusion. And then I'd like to talk a little bit about what's next system wide; what are some of the initiatives and activities that we're undertaking, and then I welcome the discussion that follows.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
But you know, I want to tell you as much as I enjoy being the Vice President for Graduate and Undergraduate Affairs, Vice Provost for Equity, Diversity, Inclusion Chief Diversity Officer, I did not want this job. I did not want this job. And I didn't want this job because I was perfectly happy doing what I was doing as Vice Provost for Education Partnerships, right. The University is, I mean, first in the nation, with how we prepare students for the University of California and other selective universities, we have a footprint in every county in California, from Modoc all the way down to the Mexican border. We train exemplary teachers for K 12. And we help students prepare for university in ways that are unparalleled. And I was perfectly happy doing that work. And then one day, the president of the University said, Well, I want you to be the Vice Provost for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion. And I said, Well, yeah, thank you. But yeah, no, I don't I don't want to do that. And she asked me why. And I said, because I don't think the University really has a handle on what it wants to do. And I think that we spend a lot of time in the symbolic but not in the other domains, that would really make EDI work possible.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
But the more I thought about it, the more I thought about how important it was for the University of California, to lead the way, right, the University of California should lead the nation in inclusive excellence. And so it's with that challenge that I've approached the work that I do today. So I'd like to share my screen with you. And hopefully, I don't have any technical difficulties, it happens sometimes, that I can't always share my screen. Can you all see that? Does that? Does that looked good for you? Yes. Perfect. Okay.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
So I want to start with the framework that we are putting in place across the University for EDI work. And it consists of three domains. One is leadership, right, which is our vision. The dean talked about PRIDE as the acronym for your approach for your vision of the University, but it's also about accountability. It's about governance, in terms of how you are holding yourself responsible and accountable for the work that you do. And it's also about role modeling. How do our leaders show up in a symbolic way to represent our values when it comes to equity, diversity and inclusion, and some of the ways that leadership plays a role at the University, a lot has to do with our Regents who have on the books policy, Regents' policy on diversity, that shapes the set of values around equity and inclusion that we aspire to at the University. The Regents are also holding the University accountable for its efforts. And every year we go in front of the Regents with an accountability report where we detail the progress that we're making, and the progress and where we need to improve, when it comes to specifically the compositional diversity of our university.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Another part of leadership is acknowledgement. It's acknowledging that systemic racism and systemic exclusion are behaviors and practices at the University of California. And we've seen leaders take this acknowledgement seriously. Most recently, you might remember that the Berkeley campus has renamed a number of buildings that had been named in honor of slave owners and other people who have practiced exclusion and racism. So you see LeConte Hall will be renamed and the Boalt Hall was renamed to Berkeley Law a couple of years ago. You will also see circulating maybe today, up for a system wide review is updated policy for NAGPRA, which is Native American Graves Repatriation Act. So the University taking seriously what our tribes have said to us about repatriation and cultural remains and our stewardship of those artifacts.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
So acknowledgment is a key part of leadership. It's the symbolic but very, very, very important role that leaders play.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Let me talk about the structures that have to be in place for a successful EDI work at the University: structures, processes, practices, systems, algorithms, and policies are how we define the structure. When I first became the system level vice president and vice provost, I didn't have a counterpart across all of the campuses. The longest standing Chief Diversity Officer, if you will, at the University of California is actually at the UCSF campus. And it's Dr. Renee Navarro, who is an exemplar and role model in this field, and who stands in support of the deans and the departments and the divisions at UCSF for their efforts. So having a structure across the system of Chief Diversity Officers.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Now, what's interesting is that even though there were a few executive level Vice Chancellor for Equity and Diversity, not all campuses had that model. But we've seen that model evolve, so that all but two campuses actually have a an executive level cabinet level CTO in the form of a vice chancellor. So that's a lot of progress and infrastructure. And increasingly, we are seeing them with the kinds of portfolios that support the work programs, that they have funding the opportunities to provide incentives for good practice for to recognize the University and recognize individuals and divisions and departments for the work that they're doing.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
We've also, in structure, is looking at the policies that we have in place, and how those policies advance or undermine our efforts toward inclusive excellence. And I'll give you a recent example of some of the things that we do, maybe unintentionally, that actually foster exclusion. We have a lot of information systems across the University of California. And what we were finding was that despite the fact that the State had had passed a gender recognition act a couple of years ago, and campuses that felt like there was a need to acknowledge and to comply with that, there wasn't really a requirement that we comply with that. And what was happening was that because there wasn't a system wide requirement, there was inconsistency with respect to how information systems were handling people's preferred name. And there was a lot of discomfort and a lot of grievance with having your legal name be the default name when you had a preferred name.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
And we realized that there was no policy that guided the development of [an] information system that would promote inclusion for individuals who had a preferred name. And so we implemented last year, a new policy, gender identity, and live name, system wide policy, that requires that our information system, all up and down the system from UC Path to whatever is doing, your student rosters, allow for people to use their preferred name and guidance there because information systems and algorithms are also tools of exclusion. So we want to look at all of our policies, all of our practices to see how they are perhaps unintentionally fostering exclusion.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
And then the third is behavior. How do we build the cultural competencies, the mindsets, equitable decision making, the skill sets, and the relationships that will help people thrive and feel like they belong at the University of California. And so when we think about behavior, we often think about, well, how do we hold people accountable for the actions that they take. And so you know, that kind of accountability is important, but it's also important to have a cadre of individuals across the system who are trained to interrupt bias, who can serve as equity advisors in their departments and in their divisions, and who can lead institutional change for better equity based decisions.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
And a couple of things that we've been doing recently with our CSU colleagues, is a system wide effort that we call Beyond Bias. And what we are doing with our CSU colleagues, is training leaders, faculty leaders, student leaders, and staff leaders, to be leaders around equity, to be leaders highly skilled in interrupting bias and fostering a more positive campus climate. We've trained more than 1000 individuals across UC and CSU this year. We had to pivot that to remote and I was surprised at how well it worked, but it's actually worked well. The other thing that we've been doing is instituting a lot more training for managers, for supervisors, and for other leaders. And so we have available for anyone in the system to take a six module course online called managing implicit bias. We've seen explosion in use of this particularly when as a benchmark for engagement in recruitment activity. So search committees having as a requirement for service, the completion of that course, equity advisors in the search process to help interrupt biases and keep a search committee as bias-free as possible.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Those are the frameworks that we that we are taking at the University of California in those domains, leadership, structure, and behavior for inclusive excellence. Joanna asked me to talk about where we are now, right, so we have these aspirations, where are we today.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Let me talk about the State of California, and what the State looks like, and what the University of California looks like. So UC does not mirror the State's demographic reality, particularly when it comes to our students. At UC, we have a large number of... we admitted last year as undergraduates the largest number of Chicanx Latinx students in our history, but they also make up half of the student population in K-12. So the State demographic reality matters. And you may have seen an article today in the LA Times and it was about the, you know, how to equitably fund the University of California, the haves and the have nots. And it focused primarily on UC Merced and UC Riverside as the two campuses that were better serving the most diverse students, but have relatively less resources, particularly in terms of private endowment, than than the other campuses. But there was a point in this article that stood out to me today, and it said, you know, the taxpayers of California are paying for the University of California, for institutions that their children cannot attend. And so the reality of the University of California is that if we don't begin to look more like the State, we're going to see a disinvestment. Even more, even greater disinvestment than we've seen, to date, if we do not begin to accelerate our efforts to diversify our faculty, our students, and our administrative leadership. The good news is that there is some progress, the bad news is that there's not enough progress. Now, the other context in which the University does its equity, diversity and inclusion work is in the context of Proposition 209. And Proposition 209 prohibits the University from considering race, gender, or ethnicity in hiring, in admissions, and in procurement. And so that is, in many ways, like operating with one hand behind our backs. But it doesn't preclude us from setting aspirational aspirations for the University. It does preclude us from setting goals. So people will often say, Well, what is your goal, we really can't have a goal. But we can have benchmarks against which we measure our progress. So we can look, for example, at availability of PhD recipients and how that availability maps to who's enrolled, or who's enrolled in our graduate [programs] or who's among our faculty, we can look at the state population to see how we compare with who's coming out of K-12 and then who's coming to the University of California.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Let me talk a little bit about undergraduate diversity. I mentioned that 50 percent of the enrollment in K-12 is Chicanx Latinx. And even though we admitted the largest class of Chicanx Latinx students in our history last year, we still see a gap there. One of the reasons that we have this gap has to do with K-12 opportunity in California. You may have heard that last May the Regents of the University of California created a new policy, remember, leadership matters, instructors matter in our diversity framework, and they eliminated the consideration of the SAT and ACT in undergraduate admissions. And so this year, the University saw even in a pandemic, we saw a very, very good increase in the number of students who identify as to Chicanx Latinx and African American and Native American in our applicant pool. Now, without the SAT and ACT, as part of our consideration, there may be some unintended consequences. So we're waiting to see what the outcomes are of the process that is underway and letters have begun to go out to students in mid February and letting them know whether they benefited or not. But one of the reasons that there could be some unintended consequence has to do with access to what we call the A through G classes, and their honors and advanced placement courses within the series. And if you know, if you were educated in California, you probably know about A through G. This is a series of college preparation classes that is unique to every high school in California. So every high school has a list of courses that meet the University's expectations for college readiness. And these are the courses that students take and is a step in the process to eligibility and for admission. Now one of the things we've seen is that underrepresented students, students from underrepresented groups, have less access to the rigorous courses in the A through G pattern, so they have less access to advanced placement courses, while they may have you know, similar access to general college prep. And it's in that comparison of the rigor between students, that an SAT score can actually make a difference. We actually have seen our students who don't meet our top nine percent by school criteria actually be statewide eligible because of the test score. So we want to see what happens when we don't have a test score to use to help evaluate students. So it should be interesting. Watch how that turns out for us. We also have at K-12, a number of outreach programs I mentioned, the University has a footprint from Modoc all the way down to the Mexico border. And that's in the form of K-12 outreach where we actually have programs that support students pipelines and pathways to college, including programs for STEM students like our math, mathematics, engineering, science achievement, or MESA, program. What we found is that when students have early and frequent exposure to the University, we are more likely to yield them their outreach or outreach program participants will come to the University of California if they receive an offer. So expanding outreach and reaching more students in K-12 is essential to helping to improve our undergraduate diversity.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
What about graduate students. So graduate students, we're seeing some increases across the disciplines, but we're really seeing our growth in international students. And for graduate diversity, what we're finding is that our undergraduates are not receiving the exposure to undergraduate research that would help them make a difference, it would help them build the relationships with faculty for those very, very important endorsements. But it would also build their research methodology and capacity skills in order for them to transition to graduate programs. A couple ways that we have been trying to address graduate student diversity are in programs that we collaborate with our partners in the historically black colleges and universities and the Hispanic serving institutions, across California, of which UC has five. And one of the things that we're trying to do here is to give much like in K 12, is to give students from these institutions, much more exposure to undergraduate research, and to help them prepare for the for graduate education with our UC-HBCU program, which is the one that's been in existence for longer, our yield rates of students from those programs are phenomenal. Students who are admitted we're seeing yield rates in the 90 percent when you compare that to about 45 to 50 percent of other other graduate student applicants. So our yield rates there are really, really good. The other thing we're seeing that's important is we're seeing that faculty are, for one, seeing a broader array of institutions from which to draw graduate students. So we're disrupting that bias of prestige. We're also seeing faculty develop additional competency when it comes to the unique needs of an HBC program of predominantly African American Black students. And let me share an example. So when we were looking at the Faculty proposals, we have a program in atmospheric science at UC Davis. And the we funded it, it was a great program. And then the next year, they asked for a whole bunch more money. So we wanted to know why. Why were they asking for so much more money? And they said, Well, you know, here's what we've learned, we've learned that if we're going to ask students from historically black colleges in the south to come to a little town in California called Davis to study something called atmospheric science, we have to bring their parents and their grandparents along, they have to come here, they have to experience it. And so what we see the faculty learning is that for black students, a decision to go to graduate school isn't necessarily an individual decision, it can be a familial decision. And so our faculty recognizing that and affirming that for our students with something that we felt was important to fund. We also, you know, have to be honest that, especially in the social sciences, in the humanities, that funding for our students is a barrier. So how can we make greater progress in those disciplines specifically to advance more five-year funding packages for our students. So a lot to do in graduate diversity, a lot of work that's going on, but a lot more that we need to do.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Let me cover the Health Professions because that's what you all do. And that's what I know you're mostly interested in. We just presented to the Reagents on our health professions diversity as part of our annual accountability report. And we know that the School of Medicine programs have the largest number of students who come from underrepresented groups with nursing having the highest proportion. Our student populations are more diverse than our resident and faculty populations. But I think that because systemic racism is such a persistent driver of health disparities, we can do a lot more with respect to health professions. The UC Health has issued a report recently called Disrupting the Status Quo, which is their strategic agenda around the UC Health enterprise. And I'll talk a little later about the health sciences taskforce and the recommendations that they have put forth that was chaired or co chaired by Dr. Navarro. And I think those recommendations will resonate with you, and I'm sure you're familiar with them already. One of the issues that they call out in the report is that the most diversity that we have in our health professions is in the health sciences clinical professor series. But they don't have the benefit of membership in the Academic Senate. So they're not at the table when academic policy is being made. And so that's a recommendation to change that that is a key part of that report.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
And then on faculty diversity, this is the area that we get a lot of pressure on. Because our faculty don't look like our students. But our faculty rates change very, very slowly because faculty have such long careers at the University of California. We are seeing slight increases in our Chicanx, Latinx, Hispanic Latino ladder-rank faculty and we are seeing increases in the number of faculty who are women, particularly in the STEM fields. One of the ways we benchmark our faculty diversity is to look at the National availability of doctorates. And we do see that we are exceeding or meeting the national availability threshold. And our faculty hires have been more diverse over the last five years. But it looks like a drop in the bucket in the data because our faculty has such long careers. So a couple of things that we've been doing to accelerate our faculty diversity has been to target opportunities for hire through a pilot program across the campuses that we call Advancing Faculty Diversity. And what this program allows departments to do is to propose innovative approaches to how they're going to hire for open positions and to put in place new practices for recruitment and retention for our faculty. So some of the some of the projects that have come out of this over the years have been how to how to better leverage the postdoctoral experience so that people have the postdoctoral experience and the assistant professors professorship in one package so that you're offered the postdoc as a way to do more research wherever you are, at whatever institution you are completing your, your postdoc before you transition into the Assistant Professor position. We have been doing a lot of exploration of what best practices will be for for faculty diversity and for faculty hiring. The other the other strategy that we have in place that has proved to be really instrumental in in diversifying our faculty is the President's Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. Because this fellowship program comes with a hiring incentive for departments and I believe it's two or three years of funding that departments receive when they hire a PPFP Fellow into a ladder-rank tenure track position. And PPFP Fellows, we found that of the, of those who have gone up for tenure 99 percent of them receive it. So we are we see the the President's Postdoctoral Fellowship Program along with these new practices that departments are putting into place as being instrumental to our future strategy or long term strategy to diversify our faculty.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
And then let's talk about climate because the other part and when when people talk to me about diversity, equity inclusion, mostly I hear a kind of cry for help, right, a cry for help, and how do we hold people accountable? Right, which is how do we punish them for the behaviors and the practices that they have in place? How do we have consequences for their actions. But sometimes I hear a bit of fatalism when people talk about climate and in students and graduate students in particular and what they're experiencing. I mentioned the UC-HBCU initiative. One of the events of that initiative is we bring all the fellows together to have a lunch with the President. And we didn't do it this year, of course, because, pandemic, but one of the students will have the opportunity to engage in discussion with the President. And on year a student said, she said, Well, you know, what, can we put a list of toxic labs. And I'm sitting there, and I'm eating my halibut, and I'm making a note because I'm thinking Oh, so a list of labs that study toxins, and then I realize, no, that's not what she's talking about. She just wants a list of labs where she will not belong. And for a student to have that kind of experience at the University, that ought to horrify us. But there are places at our university where our students don't feel like they belong.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
The challenge we face is one, you know, of the principles of academic freedom. But it's also that many of these complaints of allegations of discrimination don't rise to the legal standard. And we don't yet have really good ways of addressing that. And so we're constantly striking this balance between civility and respect, and the dignity and worth of everyone who is studying on our campuses who's doing research, who is learning who is working, and freedom of expression. So I'm going to talk a little bit about something that we're doing on the policy and that we hope to have will help set some some groundwork for how we might be better able to address campus climate. But in particular, our African American students are transgender non binary students, or Latino or Latinx Chicanx students are experiencing a different campus climate than a lot of our other students. So we have a lot of work to do in that behavioral part of our framework.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
So what's next? What are we what are we going to do at the University of California and at the system and on the campuses to to try to achieve our aspirations? Let me talk about anti racism initiatives, because that's a key part of what what's underway across the campuses now. So after the horrific spring that we had, with with the murders of too many black people at the hands of the police, all over campuses began to really take a hard look at what they were doing to help address racism, anti Black racism, in particular, but all forms of racism. And so they've stood up a number of initiatives to do this across the campuses. At the office of the President, we did this, Joanna you will be very happy to know that we we just did this, and part of our work was to issue a survey to employees. And then the many of you are, you know, you're all researchers, so you know how many people actually complete surveys. We had a phenomenal 58 percent of Office of the President employees take our survey about racism. And the findings were sobering. They were really sobering. And so we have a number of recommendations that we put forth to President Drake that we hope to begin implementation for soon. But all of the campuses, including San Francisco, have had a number of these initiatives. And what I hope is that these initiatives really do turn into structures and behavioral interventions for greater inclusion. Another part of anti racism and anti Black racism, in particular has been the role of policing on university campuses. And so we are system-wide engaged in examining community safety. Earlier, in February, we had the first of two Community Safety forums, every campus has, as part of his anti racism work has been looking at the role of policing, with with an eye toward transforming the University environment to when it comes to policing. And if you haven't had a chance to participate in that, I do think we have a recording of session one. And so we have we have a spectrum everything from abolition to transformation. Where we'll end up I'm not exactly sure yet. But the President has laid out racial and social justice and policing in particular, as among his key priorities for his presidency.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
I mentioned earlier that our policies and our practices around non discrimination, anti harassment could use a lot of work, because it makes it really hard for us to adjuticate these matters, particularly if they don't rise to the level of the legal standard. So we are embarking on an effort to develop a comprehensive framework with consistent policies and procedures to handle complaints of race, race discrimination, and other forms of discrimination. We took a look at the various ways that the that discrimination policy shows up at the University of California, there are actually three policies, there's one for all employees, right, so faculty and staff, there's one for staff, and there's one for students. And then for medical centers, there's also a set of laws that have their own expectation. When you look across all these policies, there are no common definitions right there. And there is no common adjudication. So depending on who you are, what position where you're positioned in the in the spectrum of students, staff, faculty, you will have a different experience in attempting to resolve grievance. So this is a real problem for the University of California. But we have a model for what our discrimination policies can look like in our our sexual violence, sexual harassment policy framework that we developed a couple of years ago that has common adjudication, timelines and frameworks, common expectations, common definitions, and common practices across the campuses. This is going to take us a long time, it needs to be a very inclusive process. We want to look at cases and and develop our strategy around the real cases that we see. We want to be able to provide definitions and protocols. And within a stronger policy framework, I think we can begin to put the kind of mandatory training that I think all people managers and leaders need. How many of you, you might think if you're a leader, if you're managing people have lose less than you did ADA training, when you had an ADA briefing? What do you What have you done around your affirmative action goals? Right? What do you know about discrimination policy framework. The amount of training the University of California mandates for people who manage other people, leaves a lot to be desired. So this is work that I'm really excited about for this year, I think it's going to begin to help us address some of these issues that just don't rise to the level where we can apply a standard of a legal definition, but are impacting our campus climate. They're impacting our belonging and they're leading to turnover rates that are unacceptable, particularly with our black and brown employees, staff and students.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
And then let me talk a little bit about the health sciences taskforce, the report of which is on the website and which was the work of Deans and leaders across the across the health sciences to come together to create a set of directions and recommendations for health enterprise. I just want to point out a couple here, because they aligned to things that I've mentioned before. One of the recommendations is to partner with higher education institutions that enroll more diverse student bodies. So we think that there's a way to expand and scale efforts like the UC-HBCU Initiative, the UC-HSI Doctoral Diversity Initiative, create great stronger partnerships with those institutions, to grow those students into our own graduate students, our own postdocs and into our own faculty. There is a need to increase funding for diverse for faculty, right, so we need to target recruitment to diverse faculty increase the number of incentives for those faculty. The program that I mentioned, across the campuses, the Advancing Faculty Diversity serves as a good model for how the health enterprise can can do that work. And then to develop an action plan at each location to address anti racism and diversity, equity and inclusion. And to do that fairly, fairly quickly. That work will be supported by work that is underway by through our UC-Coro collaborative leadership network, to develop a rubric for anti racist practice to identify on a scale, what is resistance and what is champion and everything in between, that I think can help us with, especially around performance around behavior, and in terms of informing what our strategy looks like moving forward.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
And I would be remiss if I didn't talk about the role that COVID-19 has had on equity and how the pandemic has the potential to set the University back by a generation, if we are not intentional about how we recover with equity as a result of the pandemic. We know that for our graduate students, research has been completely demolished. Time to degree is up in the air. What your job looks like is completely unknown. We've seen declines in funding and SF funding, other kinds of funding, and we've seen a decline in general wellbeing and people's mental health. It has had an enormous impact. It's had enormous impact on faculty who are women, research, productivity has declined during the pandemic so quickly, and it's almost as if it fell off a cliff. And that has a lot of implications for tenure and promotion, and for pension at the University of California. So we need to anchor our COVID-19 response and equity. We need to measure what the pandemic has done across our different populations. And we need to have strategies that address those populations and their unique needs. We also have an opportunity in the pandemic, as everybody reconciles with what EDI looks like in whatever spaces they're occupying, including agencies that provide funding to contribute to how they recognize and reward and value, equity and inclusion as part of their decision making for awards. We can also as a university through our federal, our federal government relations and our state governmental relations, to have the funding that has been on decline for a number of agencies NFF, NIH, lots of different grants, early career grants, graduate student opportunities, to have that funding be restored after years of decline. And we can also look at our own admissions practices, particularly in graduate education, to see if they really are meeting the needs of our programs and of the future generation of graduate students and future faculty. There is work underway, through led by UCSF but with a number of our campuses in partnership called AMIGA, that has been piloting and evaluating holistic admissions practices for that very reason. The pandemic has provided a lot of opportunity, right? If you can't take a GRE, if you can't take an SAT, then we have to make decisions without them. What can we learn and how can we grow and evolve our practices to to truly reflect greater equity.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
So in closing, I want to share with you some takeaways, but I also want to share with you a little story so we're making some gains, right, we're seeing we're seeing increases in our undergraduate diversity, a few increases in our graduate in diversity, some increases in our faculty, particularly in the last five years. But, but but we have to do so much more because COVID has knocked us off course. Our surveys continue to show that there are populations who are struggling for belonging in our in our university, and those populations have unique needs and we should focus on those population's when we think about COVID recovery. And I want to share a story with you that has stayed with me for a couple of years now, and I think really has helped to inform me, and I hope informs you about how we need to approach this moving forward. Right. I was at UCLA, and there's a graduate student there. And he said, You know, I want to tell you how I think the University of California approaches diversity. And I said, Sure, sure. Tell me, tell me what you think. He said. So imagine that you are walking on the UCLA campus, and you're in front of Janss steps. And if you're familiar with Janss steps, it's one of those iconic places on the UCLA campus where you know, everybody's gonna pass through at some time or another. And he said, so imagine that somebody dumps a pile of bricks there, and everybody who just happens to be on Janss steps at that time, is asked to build a building, right, asked to build a building. And so it sticks with me for a couple of reasons. The first is that there's a sort of tacit acknowledgement that the University thinks of diversity as everyone's job. And that's a that's a good thing. One of the reasons I told you earlier how I did not want this job. One of the reasons I didn't want this job was that I wasn't sure that everybody would think of it as their job too. I like to say that you're all the Chief Diversity Officer of whatever area you have responsibility for. So it's a collective effort. And that's a good thing. But the other thing he was saying was that that we were not intentional in how we were going about our EDI work. So just because you're around doesn't mean you have the skills, the knowledge, the ability to do good diversity work to do good equity work. And so intentionality, skills development, focusing on what makes an inclusive environment, leadership, behavior, structures, those are all important skills, knowledge and abilities that we need in order to create the inclusive university of the future. So what we have to do is recalibrate what we value. We have to recalibrate what we value. We can't just oh my goodness, a crisis happened. Let's make a statement and form a program. But we have to look at the institution for what needs to be changed. And we need to look at our processes, our practices, our policies, our structures, our behaviors and our leaders. If we're going to do that. Let's stop there, and ask if there are questions that I can answer.

[Sharon L. Youmans, PharmD, MPH]
With Dr. Gullatt, thank you so much. That was a very powerful presentation with lots of good information, encouraging information, but also a daunting feeling that we still have a lot of work to do. So thank you for sharing that with us. And we do have a couple of questions in the Q&A. Liana, do you want to go ahead and read those out or Joanna?

[Joanna Trammell]
I'm happy to read them.

[Sharon L. Youmans, PharmD, MPH]
Okay.

[Joanna Trammell]
What are the five schools that have the HBCU ties?

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
So I think when I say five schools, I mean, the universities that have the HSI designation, Hispanic Serving Institution, so they are Merced, Riverside, Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara and Irvine. Burke Davis has not received its formal designation. So in order to be an HSI, you need to have 25 percent of your undergraduate population identifies Chicanx Latinx. So UCSF because you don't have an undergraduate population will never be an HSI, for that reason. Davis has is almost close. There's a methodology issue, but they have received recognition in the form of a number of grants that they've received from different agencies who recognize them as HSI. So we need the other three of Berkeley, LA and San Diego but every Chancellor has made a commitment to becoming an HSI campus. And because of the HSI status, the University has the opportunity to be the very, very first and I would argue the most renowned Hispanic serving slash minority serving research university system. Right. We have that opportunity right in front of us. We are the most prestigious universities to hold HSI status. We have seen recognition for that in the form of grants that and awards that the University has received. We've also seen recognition for that in terms of our rankings, particularly our rankings on social mobility. So HSI status, holds a lot of value for the University. But. But. But we cannot just be an Hispanic admitting University, Hispanic enrolling university we have to be Hispanic survey. And so as much as it's great to have 25, or more percent of our students be undergraduates who identified as Chicanx Latinx, if we aren't transforming our institution to meet the needs of those students, and I don't mean in a deficit way, I don't mean to say Oh, because we have a lot of Chicanx that we need more tutoring. I'm saying in a way that affirms and supports them. And so the mismatch that we have between who our faculty are and who our students are, means that those students are less likely to have that serving environment that the HSI designation aspires to. So we have work across the campus, a UC collaborative that is moving in that direction. So we actually bring together the campuses that are emerging HSI so that they learn from the campuses that have gone through, not just the the formal process of designation, but from the practices that the campuses have put in place, including things like looking at, you know, if we have the highest enrollment, you know, we keep the top students in California 12 and a half percent up 12 and a half percent come to University of California. But the drop off in STEM majors is unbelievable. So we're looking at equity and racial disparities and grading and courses, because it doesn't, I don't think there's a faculty member in the world who says my goal, my outcome for my course, is that a student doesn't want to study this. I can't think that that's it. But when we look at the trajectory of students who come in with an interest in STEM, but who don't end up in an interest in STEM, we see that there are racial disparities there. So there's a lot of opportunity through the funding that the campuses are receiving to open up more information and greater sharing across campuses of good practices that will make a difference, especially for for STEM pathways.

[Joanna Trammell]
We have several more questions. And I want to be mindful of time. We are going out of order because this one is pertaining to the question, why wouldn't UCSF qualify as an HSI status? Is it only designated to undergrad schools?

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
That's exactly right. It's 25 percent of your undergraduate population.

[Joanna Trammell]
Next question, because of what you said about the familil decision of Black graduate students who attend graduate school, is there a push to attract Black students from California rather than from out of state?

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Oh, that's a great, that's a really great question. So as you know, Proposition 209 prohibits us from doing a lot of things that have to do with race, ethnicity and gender. This is another place where HSI status makes a huge difference. In the CSU system, 21 of the 23 campuses are HSI campuses. Almost all of our California community colleges are HSI campuses. So we can use our UC-HSI Doctoral Diversity Initiative to identify students from those universities and colleges for our programs. And so that's what we've been doing as part of our HSI initiative is to focus on California students. And so the more campuses in the UC system that are HSI, the more, the more opportunities there will be for our own students, both at UC and CSU, to participate in undergraduate research at the University with our extraordinary faculty, and then move on to graduate graduate school. And in that way, we would be growing our own California students, as our own faculty, our own postdocs, and eventually our own faculty, or our graduate students, faculty.

Unknown Speaker
Excellent. Excellent.

[Joanna Trammell]
Great. So our next question, I don't know, even if this is actually something that you would be able to answer. And honestly, I would really like for this person to maybe elaborate a little bit more on that so that we can really address this issue and maybe at a later date, but what is School of Pharmacy doing to address the toxic lab situation? So I'm not sure if anyone wants to address that. But again, I think it would be helpful to get a little bit more context, because obviously, you know, this is something that we want to address if something is happening in the labs, but you know, are not conducive to our PRIDE values.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
I can't speak to Pharmacy. I think this is a problem across the University of California. I think the exclusion that happens in labs is horrific. There will be, so right now part of the problem is we don't actually have anti bullying policy. On the books we have guidelines right but that's not policy. So I understand that there is anti bullying policy coming that will be important to being able to address some of this but I think I also think, you know, I talked about people managers, and I think we often don't think about faculty as people, managers, and having a responsibility as a people manager for inclusive environments. And so I think that there is a need for all people managers at the University, whether you're supervising graduate students and postdocs, or whether you are working in administrative office to have a set of trainings and behavioral but also about the law, about the law, about ADA, Americans with Disabilities, about equal opportunity about discrimination that you have a baseline foundation, so you understand the legal ramifications of your behavior, and that there be requirements for people managers for training. I can't speak more to to Pharmacy, but this is this is an issue across the University, and it's horrific.

[Joanna Trammell]
Thank you for that. I think we have maybe two more minutes left. So there's just one quick question about what K through 12 outreach pipeline programs is the School of Pharmacy involved into address DEI?

Unknown Speaker
Mm hmm.

[Joanna Trammell]
You know, I think I'll just speak for the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, we are working with pilot program with the high school KIPP, in terms of bringing them into our labs for internships, there's also a speaker series, and it's something we are partnering with BTS and QBI, as well. I know that ClinPharm is also working on efforts in this area as well. So you know, as our Dean mentioned, you know, we have made progress, but there is much more work to be done. And I know, in the department of Pharm Chem, we have a DEI committee, and I know that those are being formed in the other departments as well. So I encourage all of you to be a part of that that is open for staff, faculty, and students, so that your voice can be heard. And so I just wanted to thank you, Yvette,

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
May I add something to your remarks, Joanna. Every campus has an Office of Early Academic Outreach, and at UCSF, it's called the Center for Science Education and Outreach. They have a relationship with every school in San Francisco. I know health pathways are incredibly important. And you might consider tying align your efforts to that structure and that those deep relationships that your campus has already developed with your local schools.

[Sharon L. Youmans, PharmD, MPH]
And I'll just add, we do with working with that office, and also with the students that they bring to campus. So yes, that is a way and sometimes we get, you know, a few students from those programs who eventually apply to our PharmD program. So they are important. I wish we had another hour because I could ask a bunch of more questions about...

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Call me anytime.

[Sharon L. Youmans, PharmD, MPH]
I will. I will take you up on that.

[Joanna Trammell]
Joe, if you wanted to maybe say a few closing remarks that end up today's first event?

[B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD]
Sure. Thank you, Joanna. So first, I guess I would say there were a couple of comments that I that poor, Dr. Gullatt is probably not equipped to answer about the School of Pharmacy and the question about the laboratories that individuals should feel free to go to the respective department chair, me as dean, and the program director, and I would ask them to be active and reach out. The second thing. So that's a little bit of homework there. And then, and really, I'm going to thank you both Dr. Gullatt., and Joanna, the two of you together, Joanna for the organization and Dr. Gullatt for the just really wonderful presentation. We are fortunate to have you both actually. And so I'll leave it at that. And thank you. Thank you all the participants as well, and I look forward to the next one. Thank you again, Dr. Gullatt.

[Yvette Gullatt, PhD]
Thank you so much.

Wed Oct 20, 2021 Creating Healthy and Inclusive Spaces – Equity and Inclusion Speaker Series
Tue Mar 2, 2021 This page:
Gullatt delivers first session of the Equity and Inclusion Speaker Series

About the School: The UCSF School of Pharmacy aims to solve the most pressing health care problems and strives to ensure that each patient receives the safest, most effective treatments. Our discoveries seed the development of novel therapies, and our researchers consistently lead the nation in NIH funding. The School’s doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program, with its unique emphasis on scientific thinking, prepares students to be critical thinkers and leaders in their field.