UCSF

Tagged: protein-protein interactions

Jason Gestwicki, PhD

Gestwicki
Professor in Residence

My research group studies how molecular chaperones maintain protein homeostasis. This question is important because imbalances in protein homeostasis are linked to a number of incurable diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Molecular chaperones regulate all aspects of a protein’s lifecycle, including its expression, folding, trafficking and degradation. However, it isn’t yet clear how we might promote the activity of chaperones to cure diseases. Our approach to this question is to develop chemical probes that reveal how chaperones interact with disease-associated proteins.

Susan Miller, PhD

Miller
Professor

Broadly, I use a variety of biochemical and biophysical tools to investigate protein structure/function questions spanning the range of elucidating novel aspects of catalysis in individual enzymes to understanding the interactions of proteins within a pathway and how mutations influence flux through the pathway. Current work is focused on understanding how key enzymes and transport proteins of bacterial mercury detoxification pathways work individually, with each other, and with other host cell proteins to rapidly remove the toxic threat of organomercurials (such as Methyl-Hg) and mercuric ions from their environment.

Shu receives NIH New Innovator Award to study protein interactions

Xiaokun Shu, PhD, has been named a recipient of the 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s New Innovator award, which will provide up to $1.5 million in research funding over the next five years.

Reflection: 30 years of top NIH funding for UCSF School of Pharmacy