UCSF

Tagged: DNA

Ahituv Lab research finds how bats grow wings, with implications for human limb development

Researchers in the laboratory of UCSF School of Pharmacy faculty member Nadav Ahituv, PhD, study the roles of gene regulatory elements—DNA segments that tell genes when, where, and to what extent to turn on and off—including in human conditions ranging from limb malformations to epilepsy and autism.

Gartner named one of Popular Science’s “Brilliant 10” of 2015

The next frontier in developing therapies for cancer and other diseases could come through studying organ development or tumor growth in living humans. Problem is, there’s no ethical way of doing that using current technology.

Zev Gartner, PhD, has focused on the next best thing: His lab is building fully functioning 3-D human tissue, cell by cell.

Ahituv study provides new insights into enhancer gene regulation

Research led by UCSF scientists has provided fresh insight into the operation of DNA sequences in the genome that regulate gene expression.

The new study looked at the effects of inserting nearly 5,000 synthetic regulatory element sequences into mice as well as human liver cells. Specifically, these were enhancers, snippets of DNA which, when bound by protein molecules called transcription factors, contribute to gene activation.

Zev Gartner, PhD

Gartner
Professor

My laboratory is working to understand how cells assemble into multicellular tissues, how the structure of tissues controls the behavior of individual cells, and how changes to tissue structure drive the progression of diseases like cancer. Toward these goals, we build, perturb, and model human tissues in vitro using techniques from the chemical, engineering, physical and biological sciences.

Voigt and Tabor talk synthetic biology on TV

Synthetic biologist and UCSF School of Pharmacy faculty member Christopher Voigt, PhD, and Jeffrey Tabor, a postdoctoral scholar in Voigt's laboratory, discuss the field and promise of synthetic biology in this July 21, 2009 KQED television segment.

Video:

Study reveals how to make gasoline from yeast and bacterium

A chemical precursor molecule of gasoline can be produced from biomass and salt, according to research by UCSF School of Pharmacy's Christopher Voigt, PhD, and UCSF colleagues.

Ahituv asks why some DNA is ultraconserved

Research by Nadav Ahituv, PhD, faculty member in the UCSF School of Pharmacy, shows that laboratory mice that had specific sequences of their DNA removed eat, grow, and reproduce normally.