UCSF

Tagged: molecular docking

School of Pharmacy emeriti Kollman, Kuntz, and Langridge honored with UCSF Medal

Drug discovery today begins with computation rather than test tube experimentation. Three School of Pharmacy faculty emeriti, Robert Langridge, Irwin “Tack” Kuntz, and the late Peter Kollman, were awarded the UCSF Medal for creating computational tools for drug discovery that are now used worldwide.

Shoichet receives DeLano Award for Computational Biosciences

Brian Shoichet, PhD, faculty member in the School’s Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, has been named the 2017 recipient of the DeLano Award for Computational Biosciences.

Shoichet co-led research develops safer, potentially less addictive painkiller

Research co-led by UCSF School of Pharmacy faculty member Brian Shoichet, PhD, has developed a new opioid drug candidate that blocks pain as effectively as morphine in mice, without triggering dangerous side effects, and also apparently without the addictive properties of current prescription painkillers.

Shoichet study sheds light on “dark” cell receptors, potential drug targets

More than a quarter of all drugs work by targeting one of a large family of proteins called G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Hundreds of different GPCRs are embedded in cell membranes, converting stimuli from the outside world—neurotransmitters, hormones, even light—into intracellular signals that can change cell behavior.

New NIH funding awarded to UCSF School of Pharmacy postdoctoral fellows in 2011

New research support awarded to the UCSF School of Pharmacy by the National Institutes of Health during the 2011 fiscal year included two on-going projects by postdoctoral fellows:

Scientists Reveal Enzyme's Function by Its Structure

The evaluation of large amounts of biological information can help infer the function of many enzymes in the body, but for some enzymes that are not related to proteins whose activity is already understood, bioinformatics can be unreliable.