UCSF

Tagged: implant

Hiding in plain sight

A tiny implant promises to simplify how glaucoma drugs are administered, making life easier for aging patients.

SmartPlanet video features The Kidney Project

The implantable bioartificial kidney is explained in this December 6, 2010, SmartPlanet video featuring Shuvo Roy, PhD, a faculty member in the UCSF Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine.

Roy shares promise of bioartificial kidney

Shuvo Roy, PhD, an engineer and research scientist, is leading a U.S. project to build the world’s first bioartificial kidney to treat end stage renal disease. The goal is to surgically implant this coffee-cup-sized device in a human patient within 5 to 7 years. The bioartificial kidney both filters toxins from the blood and performs many of the metabolic functions of the healthy kidney. And, the bioartificial kidney requires no batteries or external pumps.

Animation shows bioartificial kidney in action

A national research project is under way to develop an surgically implantable bioartificial kidney using the latest advances in science and technology with the goal of both improving the health and lives of patients with end stage renal disease and saving health care dollars.

Roy unveils model of bioartificial kidney

The model for a surgically implantable bioartificial kidney the size of a coffee cup has been unveiled by the national project's lead researcher, Shuvo Roy, PhD, a member of the UCSF Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences. The device is intended to give patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) the health benefits of a kidney transplant while addressing the limited number of donors.