UCSF

Tagged: bacteria

Yang study demonstrates simulator to study antibiotic dosing against biofilms

Nearly every human bacterial infection—including some of the most serious, life threatening, and costly to treat—can take the form of a biofilm, in which bacteria aggregate into structured communities that enclose themselves within a secreted slime.

Fischbach joins project to generate drugs from bacterial genomes

Bacteria generate small molecules to fend off their fellow microbes. They also produce molecules that affect the response of host organisms—including humans—to their presence. Such molecules have been a major source of antibiotics, immunosuppressants, anti-cancer agents, and other drugs. But their discovery has not been systematic and the products of bacteria living in our bodies have only recently drawn scientific notice.

Susan Miller, PhD

Miller
Professor

Broadly, I use a variety of biochemical and biophysical tools to investigate protein structure/function questions spanning the range of elucidating novel aspects of catalysis in individual enzymes to understanding the interactions of proteins within a pathway and how mutations influence flux through the pathway. Current work is focused on understanding how key enzymes and transport proteins of bacterial mercury detoxification pathways work individually, with each other, and with other host cell proteins to rapidly remove the toxic threat of organomercurials (such as Methyl-Hg) and mercuric ions from their environment.

Michael Fischbach and Tejal Desai focus on “micro” solutions to improve health with drugs

Faculty members in the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, UCSF Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine, share their research on the human microbiome and microfabricated drug delivery systems and their hopes for how their science will improve the health of patients.

Reflection: 30 years of top NIH funding for UCSF School of Pharmacy

Logic gates allow bacteria to work like computers

Logic gates, similar to those that form the basis of silicon computing, can now be inserted into bacteria via genetic engineering, making it possible to manipulate bacteria to perform complicated tasks. This finding will ultimately enable cells to be programmed with more intricate functions, allowing cells to produce pharmaceuticals, materials, and industrial chemicals. The technique also has potential for application in agriculture.

Fujimori unveils enzymatic process in bacteria that leads to antibiotic resistance

Research results published from the UCSF research laboratory of Danica Galonić Fujimori, PhD, have revealed a radical approach employed by bacteria to alter their ribosomes and thereby evade antibiotics. These findings could ultimately lead to the development of ways to block this enzymatic transformation.

Study Reveals How to Make Gasoline from Yeast and Bacterium

A chemical precursor molecule of gasoline can be produced from biomass and salt, according to research by UCSF School of Pharmacy's Christopher Voigt, PhD, and UCSF colleagues.

Voigt and Synthetic Biology: Art Meets Calculus

Christopher A. Voigt, PhD, faculty member in the UCSF School of Pharmacy, is studying how to engineer living systems to solve widespread problems of society, such as our dependence on petroleum-based fuels.

Voigt Pioneers Field of Synthetic Biology

Christopher A. Voigt, PhD, UCSF School of Pharmacy scientist, and colleagues are engineering bacteria to target tumors and create images. This work is part of the emerging field of synthetic biology, which aims to create new biological parts, systems, and tools, and redesign existing biological systems for useful purposes, including: