Tagged: PharmD Degree Program

Update from the Dean - Spring/Summer 2016

Education: Evolving PharmD curriculum, Daniels Curriculum Awards; Collaborations and partnerships: pharmacy residency, UCSF/Haas MD/PhD startup marketplace; Patient care: SB 493 update; Faculty honors: Benet, Abate, Craik, Wells, Kroon, Corelli, Hudmon, Bourdet, Fischbach; Research publications: genetic testing, pharmacogenomics, cancer, computational tools & modeling (Phillips, Shin, Altschuler and Wu, Sali, Savic); Research funding: Top in NIH funding, protein design, specialty drugs (Kortemme, Stebbins, Cocohoba), QBI (Nevan Krogan), Koda-Kimble Seed Awards; Inclusion: Inequality in health research (Burchard), Black Heritage Month Gala, Post-Baccalaureate program; Alumni: UCSF Alumni Weekend, Distinguished Alumni of the Year (Adler); International: malaria, oncology residency (Chamankha, Yee); Appointments: LeJeune; Media: Desai, Apollonio, Gestwicki; Campus News: Gifts to neuroscience: Dolby Family Fund, Oberndorf Foundation, Weil Family Foundation and Joan and Sanford I. “Sandy” Weill; White House Precision Medicine Summit (Giacomini, Burchard); Cancer Moonshot visit from Vice President Joe Biden (Gartner); Cool Campus Challenge (Beck).

UCSF researcher receives prestigious gold medal

Alameda resident receives prestigious gold medal
Wed May 18, 2016

Classroom pharmacogenetics, post-hospital medications, and post-brain-surgery drugs take top honors

Studies of pharmacogenetics testing of pharmacy students as a teaching tool, an improved system to resolve medication issues after patients go home from the hospital, and the prophylactic use of an antiseizure drug for brain surgery patients took top honors at the Department of Clinical Pharmacy 18th Annual Spring Research Seminar.

Stebbins, Cocohoba leading specialty drug study with Walgreens

So-called specialty drugs can represent lifesaving advances in the treatment of serious complex conditions, such as cancers, hepatitis C, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease. They can turn once routinely lethal diseases such as HIV and cystic fibrosis into manageable chronic conditions. They can address rare genetic conditions, such as hemophilia, or suppress immune rejection after organ transplants.

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