Tagged: medication adherence

Ling takes policy know-how to the clinic

Tina Ling was born in a refugee camp in Thailand after her parents fled the genocide in Cambodia. Growing up in Southern California in an immigrant-rich community, she saw her parents and many of their neighbors struggle with their new country’s language, culture, and economics—including access to health care and health literacy.

A MedList clinic: perspectives of a pharmacist and a student pharmacist

UCSF, Walgreens open pharmacy to jointly explore new models of care

A unique new pharmacy developed to explore more effective models of medication management and pharmacist-based patient care, improving drug safety and efficacy by reducing medication errors and lapses, officially opened with a ribbon cutting on the Parnassus campus on Tuesday.

“Walgreens at UCSF,” located across the street from UCSF Medical Center, is a joint effort between the nation’s largest drug store chain, the UCSF School of Pharmacy, and the Medical Center.

Posters tracking beta blocker side effects, antibiotic use, blood thinner adherence take top seminar honors

Studies of whether patients are taking a blood thinner as prescribed, whether antibiotic treatment of cancer patients’ fevers matches guidelines, and whether one form of a leading cardiovascular drug increases the risk for a serious side effect took top honors at the Department of Clinical Pharmacy’s 15th annual Spring Research Seminar.

Jennifer Cocohoba, PharmD

Professor

My research focuses on developing and testing interventions to improve medication adherence, pharmacist communication around adherence, determining associations between refill patterns and HIV antiretroviral adherence, antiretroviral pharmacoepidemiology and guideline concordance, and antiretroviral treatment disparities.

The HIV pharmacist: helping patients pick and stick with lifesaving drugs

How do you convince patients who feel fine to take medicines that can have major side effects?

How can you help them stay on their lifesaving daily medications for years to come despite the obstacle course of everyday life?

How do you help patients and providers choose the best combination of three or more drugs from a selection of more than two dozen that work in multiple ways to fight a virus that can mutate to resist them?

Communication Is Key to Medication Adherence

Patients benefit best from medications when they take the right medicines at the right dose and at the right time.