Tagged: gene regulatory elements

Using antibiotics to stop contamination in cell cultures changes them, study finds

The common lab practice of adding antibiotics to cell cultures to prevent contamination can actually induce genetic changes in the cells, a paper senior-authored by Nadav Ahituv, PhD, found. Ahituv is a faculty member in the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, a joint department of the UCSF Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine.

Update from the Dean - March 2017

Nation debates possibility of dramatically new directions for health care coverage, science funding, immigration, education; Revealing malaria/HIV drug interactions in children; Decreasing cancer drug toxicity while increasing dose; Engineering safer opioids; Evidence for comprehensive medication management; Medicare Part D as a learning model for pharmacy education—impact 10 years out; New genetic insights into diabetes drug response; Annotating the ‘dark genome’; Epigenetics of ethnicity; New endowed professorships made possible by private support; New Center for Cellular Construction; Major funding for UCSF-Stanford CERSI; 2017 Mary Anne Koda-Kimble Seed Award for Innovation; Welcoming the class of 2020; Three generations at the School of Pharmacy; Developing a curriculum for 2018 and beyond; AFPE honors Frank Szoka as Mentor of the Year; 2016 Chancellor Diversity Awards honor Marcus Ferrone and Peace Chukudi; Eddie Way celebrates 100 years; CPhA Hall of Fame honors Brian Komoto, Phillip Oppenheimer, Wilma Wong; $500M gift to campus from Helen Diller Foundation; UC statement on federal executive order restricting travel and entry.

Ahituv Lab research finds how bats grow wings, with implications for human limb development

Researchers in the laboratory of UCSF School of Pharmacy faculty member Nadav Ahituv, PhD, study the roles of gene regulatory elements—DNA segments that tell genes when, where, and to what extent to turn on and off—including in human conditions ranging from limb malformations to epilepsy and autism.